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Disney Hit With Anti-Trust Complaint in South Korea Over 'Frozen 2' "Monopoly"

Disney Hit With Anti-Trust Complaint in South Korea Over 'Frozen 2' "Monopoly" The complaint accuses Frozen 2 of being shown at 88% of screens on its opening day.
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'Frozen 2' "Monopoly"


The organization alleged that Frozen 2 occupied more than 88 percent of Korean screens on its opening day of Nov. 23, which violates the country’s anti-monopoly law. The PWC contends that Disney's wide release of the film falls under a clause that defines any individual or company with over 50 percent of market share as a "market-dominant enterprise." Disney has "attempted to monopolize the screens and seek great profit in the short term, restricting the consumer's right to choose," PWC's complaint said.

The complaint accuses Frozen 2 of being shown at 88% of screens on its opening day. This was measured by how many screens played Frozen 2 at least once. However, from the article: Current Korean law pertaining specifically to movie exhibition states no cap on the share of screens that one film can occupy, but the recent dominance of imported Disney tentpoles and local blockbusters by the major Korean studios has sparked fervent industry debate over the issue. Also, the way the state film council calculates screen share is different. They calculate it as the number of times a particular film is played divided by how many other films were played. By this measure, Frozen 2 had a 46% market share on its opening day.

I don't know how South Korea's theaters work, but I remember with the recent Star Wars movies, they were basically strongarming theaters into showing the Saga titles on their biggest screen for a number of weeks or else the theater wouldn't get to show the film at all. There was a lot of backlashes because some smaller theaters couldn't reasonably do either, as missing out on a star wars title would be a huge missed opportunity, but locking their best (sometimes only) screen in a small town, where everyone sees it at once, means missing out on the next title they would want to show.
So, before we get too far into the mindset that this is the theaters' fault and not Disney, let's remember that Disney is probably pushing these theaters into acting this way through their overbearing negotiating tactics. I suspect South Korea has a case here.

The metric used by PWC, as well as other film industry bodies, to measure screen share uses the percentage of screens showing a specific film at least once in the given day. But the other organizations, including the state-run Korean Film Council (KOFIC), calculate screen share by taking the total number of times a certain film was shown and dividing it by the total number of times any film was shown on that day.
Using KOFIC's measure, the screen share — or percentage of showings — of Frozen 2 on Nov. 23 was 46.3 percent, not the 88 percent figure cited by PWC.
A bit more context for people not reading the article. I'd have some questions about the 88% figure since it can technically go above 100 total %. I think KOFIC's measurement is much more reasonable.
That doesn't mean they aren't doing things to push theaters behind the scenes, which I have a big problem with. It just means that it's not the 88% that the PWC is claiming, or at least that number is misleading.

The metric used by PWC, as well as other film industry bodies, to measure screen share uses the percentage of screens showing a specific film at least once in the given day. But the other organizations, including the state-run Korean Film Council (KOFIC), calculate screen share by taking the total number of times a certain film was shown and dividing it by the total number of times any film was shown on that day.
I would argue both have issues and the more important metric would be time on the screen (playing a few 1 hour/2 hour movies vs a LOTR or Avatar style epic) potentially weighted based on time (I don't care that you let me play something else earlier in the day when no one is going to the movie if every screen had to be yours from 8pm onwards).

Back in 1999, it was NOT a dying industry. There was no such thing as streaming, and even watching the Phantom Menace trailer online SWAMPED Apple servers (as Apple was for a while the only place you could go to get decent quality trailers as an incentive to install Quicktime player)
The mom and pops were for the longest time keeping the megas in check by being cheaper in part because of they had fewer screens and rotated through movies and provided discounted viewing times and days.
That all went away, and with it the days of the 5 dollar movie matinee and cheap concessions. I can distinctly remember when going to the movies with girlfriends went from spending 15 dollars with popcorn with my date in the 90's to 30+ dollars in college, to dropping nearly 65 dollars taking my kids to see Frozen 2 even with sneaking candy in...

Does it even take into account whether this was Disney's choice or if the theater owners wanted to show the movies there? Because this could legitimately just be the theaters showing the movie because they wanted to and Disney had a mutual agreement to let them do it.




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